KS3 History

Course Name: History

 

Curriculum Content

Year 7 We follow an enquiry based curriculum, with emphasis placed upon developing our students Literacy skills. The course focuses upon how Britain has been invaded and how these events have changed the lives of the people living here. It introduces students to the role of the key institutions of this country – monarchy, parliament and church

Term 1 – What have the Romans done for us?

  • How and why did the Roman Empire grow?
  • Why was the Roman army so successful?
  • Julius Caesar – hero or villain?
  • Were the Romans civilised?

Term 2 –
1. What makes a good king?

  • Why did the Normans win in 1066?
  • How did William gain control?
  • What makes a good king? – case study: King John
  • Why was there conflict with the church? – the murder of Thomas a Becket

2. What was it like to live in the Middle Ages? – Plague and rebellion

Term 3 – Why did Henry break with Rome?

  • Why did Henry VIII marry six times?
  • Why were the monasteries dissolved?
  • When did England become a protestant country? – Religious change under Edward, Mary and Elizabeth
We follow an enquiry based curriculum, with emphasis placed upon developing our students Literacy skills. The course focuses upon the developing importance of parliament and the democratic system of government. We highlight the reasons for Britain’s expansion in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and what this meant for the peoples of the Empire.

Term 1 – The English Civil War – a “world turned upside down”?

  • Why did English men fight English men?
  • Why was the Battle of Marston Moor a turning point in the conflict?
  • Why did the English execute their king?
  • Oliver Cromwell – hero or villain?
  • Why was the monarchy restored?

Term 2 – How and why did Britain come to control a quarter of the earth’s surface?

  • Why did Britain industrialise?
  • Childhood in the nineteenth century – did it exist?
  • Why did Britain want an Empire?
  • Did the British Empire bring any benefits for those who lived under its rule? Case study: India
  • The journey of a slave – from capture to life on the plantations. Why?
  • Why was the slave trade abolished at this time?

Term 3 – Why did it take so long for everyone to have the vote?

  • Who could and could not vote in 1800?
  • How and why did all men get the vote?
  • “the angel of the house” – how did this idea prevent women from having a life outside of the home?
  • The Suffragists and the Suffragettes – who achieved the most?
  • Why were women given the vote in 1918?
We follow an enquiry based curriculum, with emphasis placed upon developing our students Literacy skills. The first two terms focus upon the changing nature of warfare and the legacy of the Great War in changing society. In term 3 students commence work on their GCSE course.
Terms 1 and 2 – The First World War – a war to end all wars?

  • Why did the world go to war in 1914?
  • Why did men enlist? – propaganda and patriotism
  • Why were the trenches such dangerous places?
  • How and why had the nature of warfare changed?
  • The Battle of the Somme – a disaster from day one?
  • How did women’s lives change?
  • How and why did the war end?
  • The Treaty of Versailles – doomed to fail?
  • Why do we remember?
  • The First World War – a war to end all wars?


Term 3 – GCSE History (Edxcel ) Topic 1 – Weimar and Nazi Germany

  • The Weimar Republic – origins, challenges and recovery
  • Hitler’s rise to power 1919-1933 – development of the party and the growth of support
Term 1: Topic 1 – Weimar and Nazi Germany (cont.)

  • Nazi control and dictatorship 1933-1939 – creation of the dictatorship, controlling and influencing attitudes, opposition and resistance
  • Life in Nazi Germany – women, young people, workers and the persecution of minorities

Topic 2 – Superpower relations and the end of the Cold war

  • The origins of the Cold War 1941-1958


Term 2: Topic 2 – Superpower relations and the end of the Cold War (cont.)

  • Cold War crises – Berlin, Cuba, Czechoslovakia
  • The end of the Cold War – Attempts to reduce tension, East/West flashpoints, the collapse of Soviet control of eastern Europe


Term 3: Topic 3 – Medicine through time

  • Medicine in Medieval England
  • The Medical Renaissance
Term 1

  • Medicine in 18th and 19th Century Britain
  • Medicine in modern Britain
  • Historic environment: Medicine and the British sector of the Western Front – enquiry based learning unit

Term 2: Topic 4 – Early Elizabethan England

  • Government and religion
  • Challenges from home and abroad
  • Elizabethan society and the age of exploration


Term 3: Revision and GCSE examinations – 3 papers

How Classes are Grouped

Students remain in their tutor groups for the first 5 weeks and then grouped according to ability

Students are grouped according to ability

Students are grouped according to ability

Assessment (including homework)

Students submit at least one formal assessment per term. Throughout the course verbal feedback is given to students and they are supported in lessons.
Students are provided with target levels at the beginning of the course in order to motivate students and also to aid intervention.

Students are also encouraged to review their feedback and devise their own targets for development on a regular basis. For homework, students complete at least one extended project during the year.

Students submit at least one formal assessment per term. Throughout the course verbal feedback is given to students and they are supported in lessons.

Students are provided with target levels at the beginning of the course in order to motivate students and also to aid intervention.

Students are also encouraged to review their feedback and devise their own targets for development on a regular basis. For homework, students complete at least one extended project during the year.

Students submit at least one formal assessment per term. Throughout the course verbal feedback is given to students and they are supported in lessons.

Students are provided with target levels at the beginning of the course in order to motivate students and also to aid intervention.

Students are also encouraged to review their feedback and devise their own targets for development on a regular basis. For homework, students complete at least one extended project during the year.

 

How to support your son

  • Asking questions about homework, proofreading and supporting students in the application of the marking criteria.
  • Encouraging students to access current historical and moral issues via a range of media.
  • Supporting the revision of key words and their meaning.
  • Asking questions about homework, proofreading and supporting students in the application of the marking criteria.
  • Encouraging students to access current historical and moral issues via a range of media.
  • Supporting the revision of key words and their meaning.
  • Asking questions about homework, proofreading and supporting students in the application of the marking criteria.
  • Encouraging students to access current historical and moral issues via a range of media.
  • Supporting the revision of key words and their meaning.