KS3 History

Course Name: History

 

Curriculum Content

Term 1: Ancient Britain
Students will be introduced to a range of historical skills by studying how the Celtic people established themselves in Britain and also how the landscape of Britain changed with the arrival of other migratory groups.
Term 2: The Middle Ages
Building on the skills from term 1 students will focus on life in the middle ages. This unit explores the nature of medieval monarchy and some of the challenges faced by medieval monarchs. This unit will also explore the skill of analysis using a range of different source materials related to the topic.
Term 3: Religious change and Democracy and protest.
This topic builds on the theme of power in order to look in depth at the reformation and the effect on life in Britain. Students will focus on the changes that took place, what caused them and the consequences of those changes. This topic follows the chronological theme of year 7 study.

Term 1: Civil rights
Year 8 starts with a global focus on the causes and consequences of the slave trade. They are encouraged to consider the changing experiences of the black community, as well as changes within America as a whole. Students build upon the source analysis skills they learnt in year 7 and being to question interpretations of the past.
Term 2: Development of the British Empire
This unit focus is on how Britain developed an empire and how it financed the empire. We will investigate the role of slavery, exploration and colonisation, and the growth of the empire. Our key study will be significance, this will allow students to real- ise the impact of events on our past and the future.
Term 3: Study of a significant society in world history and a local study
This term will focus on events both globally and locally. Students start by looking at the impact of Indian independence on both the people and the country as a whole. The skills focus for this unit will be change and continuity.

In year 9 we aim to challenge students and introduce them to the GCSE syllabus. The purpose of this is to extend their understanding and enable them to sample what the GCSE course is like. Students also concentrate on source work, so as better prepare them to GCSE.

Term 1; Jack the Ripper and Victorian England; Famous villains throughout history

This unit explores that changes and challenges of 18th and 19th century Britain, specifically the capital London. Students will study reactions to the changing living conditions and the impact that social reform had. Students move on to look at interpretations of people of the past, and either justifying or challenging preconceptions.

Term 2; 20th century Conflict

In this unit students learn about the main conflicts of the twentieth century by identifying key ideas and themes and by making links and connections, skills which they will require at GCSE level. The unit focuses on the widespread impact of these conflicts through the examination of specific events.

Term 3; Holocaust


This term students focus on the significance of the Holocaust, whilst also taking into account other examples of genocide from around the world.

How Classes are Grouped

Students remain in their tutor groups for the first 5 weeks and then grouped according to ability

Students are grouped according to ability

Students are grouped according to ability

Assessment (including homework)

Students submit at least one formal assessment per term. Throughout the course verbal feedback is given to students and they are supported in lessons.
Students are provided with target levels at the beginning of the course in order to motivate students and also to aid intervention.

Students are also encouraged to review their feedback and devise their own targets for development on a regular basis. For homework, students complete at least one extended project during the year.

Students submit at least one formal assessment per term. Throughout the course verbal feedback is given to students and they are supported in lessons.

Students are provided with target levels at the beginning of the course in order to motivate students and also to aid intervention.

Students are also encouraged to review their feedback and devise their own targets for development on a regular basis. For homework, students complete at least one extended project during the year.

Students submit at least one formal assessment per term. Throughout the course verbal feedback is given to students and they are supported in lessons.

Students are provided with target levels at the beginning of the course in order to motivate students and also to aid intervention.

Students are also encouraged to review their feedback and devise their own targets for development on a regular basis. For homework, students complete at least one extended project during the year.

 

How to support your son

  • Asking questions about homework, proofreading and supporting students in the application of the marking criteria.
  • Encouraging students to access current historical and moral issues via a range of media.
  • Supporting the revision of key words and their meaning.
  • Asking questions about homework, proofreading and supporting students in the application of the marking criteria.
  • Encouraging students to access current historical and moral issues via a range of media.
  • Supporting the revision of key words and their meaning.
  • Asking questions about homework, proofreading and supporting students in the application of the marking criteria.
  • Encouraging students to access current historical and moral issues via a range of media.
  • Supporting the revision of key words and their meaning.